September ’19 – Summary of Reading

Pebble in the Sky; Isaac Asimov – Went from a mundane storyline at the start to a brilliant ending bursting with energy. I found it really hard to read this book at the start, primarily due to the massive amount of time and content Asimov spent on setting up stuff. However, as soon as Schwartz escaped, the book magnificently picked up the pace and had me invorigated right till the end. I think it was interesting to see non-Earth people treating Earth people the same way some humans treat other humans, an eye-opener for me.

I, Robot; Isaac Asimov – A storyline composed out of distinct short stories didn’t look impressive to me before I started reading the book, but I was drastically wrong. I think the definitive quality of this book is the way it represents the future. Furthermore, the sheer amount of advancement that is palpable throughout the book excited me a lot. What I absolutely loved was how human elements were combined with robotics, leading to stuff like robopsychology, cyber-sentience, and paradoxes in reality. The last chapter was a bit boring, but on an overall basis, definitely one of the better books I’ve read.

The Godfather; Mario PuzioA well-written book, full of suspense and dynamics, and successful at creating a constant sense of danger. I enjoyed how Puzio switched from character to character and exploited every possible plotline – inevitably creating contrasts and ironies. Every single action had a consequence. That being said, there were some aspects I didn’t like that much. Luca Brasi’s death really hit me hard, and it seemed pretty avoidable and impossible as well. On an overall basis, one of the better books I’ve read, certainly not the best, but a memorable read nonetheless. Puzio’s repeated emphasis on the allure of maintaining composure and calm, and the foolishness of succumbing to anger and paranoia was one of the more concrete messages that got to me.

Automate The Boring Stuff; Al Sweigart – Nice, enthralling introduction to how the powerful the python language can be when used properly. I especially enjoyed the chapters on working with APIs and web browsers. That being said, as a consequence of the book having already become really old, there are various outdated practices that could prove to be misleading. I also don’t get why there’s so much on manipulating data when the far better alternative of pandas already exists.

The Stars, Like Dust; Isaac Asimov Just amazing. This book incorporated everything from rebellion planets to emotional manipulation, had treachery and plots running beneath pre-existing sub-plots. Every page offered a monumental event, every chapter a higher mountain to climb. The end did seem a bit cringy to me, with a breadcrumb being offered for US politics, but it was nonetheless inspiring. The characters were intricately crafted, and the entire affair of good guys being bad guys and bad guys being good guys had the effect of keeping one on the edge of his/her seat. Perhaps the most brilliant aspect of the book, the thought, and later truth, of the rebellion planet not being in a mysterious nebula but instead in plain sight, and the true nature of the director being hidden away in plain sight as well managed to enthrall me.