Summary of Reading – February ’20

Talking to Strangers; Malcolm Gladwell – I think Gladwell set the bar too high with Outliers and David and Goliath. Don’t get me wrong, talking to strangers is a wonderful book but it’s in no way as impactful or as relatable as the two aforementioned books. What made outliers stand out is that it resonated with our desire to succeed and be the outlier in a group of people. What made David and Goliath stand out is the simple fact that everyone has faced a ‘Goliath’ per say at some point in their lives. Gladwell’s primary point over the course of the book is that we really don’t know how to talk to strangers, and while that is elaborated on, the book just isn’t as good as outliers. I think this is a textbook case of an author trying to unsuccessfully grow out of his own shadow. Regarding the book itself, it’s definitely an interesting read. The main lesson I took away from it is that I shouldn’t default to truth and trust everyone I talk to on face value, but also shouldn’t assume everyone is something they don’t appear to be. There’s a broad grey area in there, that’s where I should operate socially. Also, another thing I took away is that jumping to conclusions on what is clearly insufficient data isn’t really comprehensive, and mowing down on it will be helpful.

Origin; Dan Brown – The ending destroys the entire book. Brown spends the entire book building up to a huge scientific discovery, over which people have been killed and monarchs have been allegated, but throws all that tension and suspense down the drain with a discovery that fails to honor the time and effort that went into making it look exciting. Brown tries to balance science, religion, and technology, yet fails miserably. The twist at the end that Winston conducted and oversaw everything, especially the assassination of his creator, is pretty harrowing and way more impactful than the premise of the book itself. I also loved Kirsch’s character, everything from how he collected his old PCs to his Tesla publicity stunts and his pure attention-grabbing nature (relatable). Also, the king’s secret, a.k.a, his gay relationship with the bishop seemed like a complete publicity stunt to me, totally redundant and added nothing at all to the story. Seemed like an attempt at creating something that was barely marketable.

Artemis; Andy Weir – Definitely had the same level of complexity as The Martian, but fails to be as impactful. Really suffered from the protagonist giving too many personal anecdotes, which either came off as either funny or jargon. Also suffered from doing stuff that was either over-explained, or totally unnecessary. Artemis is a continuation of that long tradition of authors not being able to grow out of the shadow of their best-sellers. On the other hand, I loved the setting, and the attention to detail when it came to depicting Artemis. That entire union between a purely sci-fi world and the politics that dominates everyday life on modern day planet Earth is beautiful. The effort that goes into preventing Artemis from being entangled into the web that is crime syndicates and gang wars is also commendable.

Ready Player One; Ernest Cline – Hands down one of the best books I’ve ever read. The pure geekiness, the thrill of playing the game, and all that energy throughout the book are contagious. Every little detail, from Parzival’s X-Wing to countless DnD references. The story, in itself, is quite a rollercoaster. Cline takes the simplicity of solving a series of challenges and applies it to an endless virtual world that is the largest economic asset in reality. Countless planets, endless possibilities; everything from playing your way through movies as the lead character, to programming decades-old computers. There’s a subtle commentary, through the inclusion of the IOI, on how excessive regulation and order (being told what to do the entire time) is deplorable, and doing things for the fun of it is many times more rewarding. Definitely the type of book that can get someone hooked onto programming to a greater extent, and heaven for gamers. It played on my inner tech-savvy personality.