Summary of Reading – March ’20

Homo Deus, Yuval Noah Harari – Scary, impactful, dire, and exciting. As Harari clearly stated towards the end, the book outlines probabilities and not prophecies for the future, but each advancement in technology and each step forward in dataism he predicts bifurcates into multiple, significant impacts on us, humankind. The book pens down paths towards everything from extinction events akin to humans wiping out animal populations, to a downfall of liberalism and a completely deskilled society. Being a practitioner of data science, Harari’s message was something that just didn’t have deep implications, but also seemed real enough to be taken seriously. Another thing that stood out for me is Harari’s explanation of capitalism as a distributed data processing system, and how no single person knows the great machine works, but the great machine keeps on working; how politicians are genuinely oblivious to the working of their nations, because the working of their nation is dependant on how everything falls together and how social forces interact. I compared this to the Foundation Saga as well, where individuals play no role in the greater scheme of things, but what Harari predicts is of a much larger magnitude: humans will play no role at all.

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, Neil deGrasse Tyson – Worth a read. I had a decent idea about the stuff Tyson talks about in this book beforehand, but that didn’t prevent it from being enjoyable. I especially loved the descriptions of various elements in the cosmic sense: where they came from and their role within the universe. His entire commentary on dark matter and dark energy was also catching, especially how the effect of both counter-acts Einstein’s cosmological constant, which I’ve never heard of before. I especially remember Tyson pointing out how Einstein’s greatest blunder wasn’t the cosmological constant, but instead labelling the cosmological constant as his greatest blunder. He doesn’t betray the purpose of his book, delivering the wonder of the cosmos to all audiences, which is unique given how most books of the non-fiction, science genre pretend to be easy to grasp for anyone at all but end up being warped and confusing for most.