Summary of Reading (June ’20)

Rafa (Rafael Nadal) – I’ve never really been that engrossed with tennis so reading this book was an insight into a world I’ve never really been a part of, but it was fun nonetheless. Major parts of the book seemed like they were devoted to more tennis-tuned readers, given that there’s a lot on game specifics and a lot of tennis terminology that went flying over my head. I found it really insightful to read about the impact his social and mental stability had on his physical stability and his game. I especially found the sections on the the importance of family to Nadal, and how his circle of stability helps him. It was also inspiring to read about having such a concrete routine that you’re at the court of 5 am no matter what and no matter how much sleep you were able to get. He talks a lot about having a very focused mental state during the game, and filtering everything out but the game so that you have very high concentration, and I relate to that not just because I’ve played cricket in the past, but because that state of mind where nothing else can impact you and all your mind is bent on particular task is something I try to attain and do attain while programming or reading. The sections on humility are also wonderful to read, but also mildly humorous sometimes, especially the parts where he talks about how his uncle and coach, Toni, makes him perform small, irrelevant gestures like not walking in the middle of the group and not violating dress codes etc. I also enjoyed reading about Mallorca and the societal setup there, the amount of peace Nadal gets is incredibly valuable given not many athletes can afford that in the modern world, and seeing him talk about how important a factor that is is brilliant and wholly justified. This book deviated from my usual sci-fi adventures, but I enjoyed it but found the sections on describing games for long periods of time a bit too much.

The Three Body Problem (Cixin Liu) An incredible book that brings together two vastly different story-lines in a manner I am yet to see. The book starts out in mundane manner, throwing you straight into the action wherein the antagonist’s father dies, forming the motivation for an act we see quite a while later. Everything that occurs at the starts: the countdown, weird results from experiments, the universe flashing, seem to be pure sci-fi elements that the author eithers fails to or doesn’t explain. The beauty of this book lies in turning that around into something that is rational and believable. Even more so, it’s amazing to see the Three Body video game turn into something that exists in the real world. Of course, abandoning the question of how life even came to be on such a world, it’s fascinating to see alternate theories play out as to how the environment functions, and see hundreds of years of scientific progress occur in the span of a few pages. The different scenarios that play out: solar trygzys, triple sun days, chaotic eras and so on make this book incredibly fascinating. Add to that the depth to which all characters have been created; we have Wang who is oblivious to the grand scheme of things but a good man at his core, then we have Dang Shi who is oblivious to the big picture and not a man of science, but the guy who always solves the problem through his core set of principles, and lastly we have Ye, an almost psychopathic personality with a deep hatred for humankind, such that she’s effectively brought and end to it. Learning about the 3 body problem was an incredible experience for me. I also loved the author’s note about how most ideas that take off fall back to ground because of how the gravity of reality is too strong.

Delta-V (Daniel Suarez) – Very much new, and very relevant. While some of the things in the book were downright outlandish, how Suarez portrayed everything and how real he made the dangers of space travel seem to be made this book amazing to read. The candidate smelection process had a lot of time and space devoted to it, and it payed off with it being one of the best pre-climax sections I’ve personally read. In fact, I’d say some of the stuff in the entire candidate selection section was better than the rest of the book and the climax. It was really good at hooking me on. Some stuff that stood out during the candidate selection process: the high-co2 atmosphere puzzle solving event, the psychological test, and most importantly, how bonds were being formed. When the actual crew went up to hotel LEO to pursue other projects, I thought that the book was dying down, and I personally vouched for the chosen crew dying in their first attempt and the actual crew substituting for them, but what Saurez did was much better, although admittedly a bit rushed. I also couldn’t quite comprehend why a spaceship that had 14 billion dollars invested in it had a lot of software errors that made living unbearable and potentially fatal for the crew. I mean, come on, if you have 14 billion dollars, surely you can have a nice programming team as well who don’t mess their job up. The entire concept of mining was made so much better by the sample schematics attached by Saurez towards the end, they really payed off. The arrival of the Argo was also surprising, and Joyce’s downfall was also kind of expected but tragic nonetheless. The worst part of the book, in my opinion, was how the new investors treated the astroanuts. That seemed like pure fiction, rather than the rest of the book, which was genuinely believable and inspiring. This book also hammered into me the sort of challenges future astronauts can face, and the sacrifices they might have to make. It really drove the point home; space is hard.

Ender’s Game (Orson Scott Card) – Pretty good read. What really held me back was the sheer outlandishness of a boy of eleven years of age leading an entire army and being representative of the Earth’s military WHILE not even realizing he was doing this. I know its purely fictional, and the story is quite impressive, but the entire notion of such a young person doing all that is beyond me. Another thing I did not understand was why Mazer Rackham didn’t lead the armies. He told Ender that he wouldn’t be alive until the date of the future battle, when instead that same battle was Ender’s training. The simple explanation for this is that Ender is better than Mazer. That being said, no matter how good Ender is, why would the authorities choose a 11 year old boy with an incredible skill set over an experienced veteran and celebrated hero? That doesn’t make any sense to me. I love the elegance in how Ender is compassionate at heart and Peter is more hurtful, but how events reverse roles, making Ender seem hurtful and Peter seem compassionate. Throughout the book, Ender’s desire to not be like Peter holds him back and dominates him, whereas Peter’s desire to be more compassionate drives him to greater heights. It’s a stunning depiction of how events in the real world can pan out, and how roles can be reversed even when characters are not. In very cliche fashion, I’m going to say that the character I bonded the most with was the main character, Ender, but only because of his tendency to look at things the way they were and not the way they were conventionally taken to be. The best example of this is how each team thought of the battleroom as horizontally aligned, but Ender was the only one who viewed it as a place where you’re going down towards your enemy and not straight, and that changed a lot. His tendency to tackle the rules is also brought out by the match against two teams, where he sends a man through the gate rather than eliminating the two teams. The ending is a bit heartbreaking, especially when Ender realizes that he didn’t just obliterate the opposite side which had its own culture and legacy, but also sacrificed soldiers on his side without knowing so, and seeing how the guilt of this plays out is fascinating.

Recursion (Blake Crouch) – A book that takes science and throws it out the front door. The reasoning that time has no linearity, and that the past, the present, and the future exist as one just makes no sense. The simplest way to gauge time is drink tea; your cup of tea cools down gradually, that’s the progression of time. However, time isn’t a thing in this book. Instead, it’s a virtual construct made by our brains to make everything much more simple. And guess what this means, you can travel back and forth, but not in time, in your memories. Now, in normal conditions, this would be time travel, but since time apparently does not exist in this book, or is as traversable as a physical dimension, this is just memory travel. The part that struck me the most was how Helena and Barry were not able to figure out how to nullify everything after the original timeline in what was about 198 years, when Slade did that on his own in just a single timeline. Both of them thought about it so much that Barry, who was a police detective in the first timeline, became an astrophysicist/quantum physicist in the second and was trying to calculate the Schwarzschild radius of a memory (what?). Both of them didn’t think about returning to the previous timeline by activating a dead memory. It’s only logicial that if you can time travel, the only way to nullify your existing timeline is to go back and cut out the event that birthed your existing timeline. Instead, Barry and Helina decided to try and find a way to remove dead memories themselves rather than the events that created those dead memories, had they decided to try and pursue the latter in 198 years, they would’ve succeeded. I also don’t get why people need to be killed to be sent back into their own timeline, or why the U-shaped building building just appeared and caused mass FMS rather than it being there forever and people getting FMS when the cut-off date finally came.

Currently Reading

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (Michael Chabon)

The Brain (David Eagleman)